Below is a list of http://cirossewer.com/municipal-sewer-services/video-inspection-line-locating.phtml CKC recognized pointing dog breeds

http://kbsagert.com/category/historical-writing/ Breed descriptions, CKC breed standards and links to breed clubs:

The “gun dog par excellence” was named for the work he does – pointing game for the hunter. Britain is the breed’s country of development though the lineage traces back to a number of imported European sporting breeds. Because European dogs were too slow afield for British tastes, various crosses to other breeds were used to improve speed, scenting power, stamina and concentration. The Greyhound, Foxhound and setter may have contributed. By the mid-19th century, the Pointer had arrived and then, as now, it was a hard-driving hunting dog who has always been a top contender in field trials.
CKC Breed Standard
Long before Big Red starred in the movie of that name, the Irish Setter was a headliner both in the field and on the bench. How the breed was developed is a mystery but it’s thought various sporting breeds were in its background. A red-and-white setter was well known in Ireland by the 18th century. By means of successive outcrosses, the white was bred out and the mahogany-coloured setter had arrived. Originally a swift-moving, good-nosed sporting breed, the Irish Setter became more valued for his handsome appearance than his field talents. It was due to a few concerned fanciers that the breed has been restored to its dual role of field dog and show specimen.
CKC Breed Standard
The English Setter descends from Spanish land spaniels that ‘set’ game birds for the sportsmen’s nets, hence the name “setter.” Known in Britain since the 14th century, they were valued for their working ability rather than appearance. In 1825, Edward Laverack began a program of selective breeding to stabilize uniform type. Succeeding him was Purcell Llewellin who furthered the work of developing a breed that would perform well in the field and hold its own as a handsome show dog. These two breeders are credited with developing the elegant gun dog that became known as the English Setter and was well established in Britain and overseas before 1900.
CKC Breed Standard
Considered the original Irish Setter, the Irish Red and White was bred as a ‘setting’ dog for netting birds and was popular with sportsmen until the 1870s. The red Irish Setter and the Red and White co-existed for many years, but with the introduction of dog shows, the red soared in popularity while the Red and White was phased out. Fortunately, they were kept as personal hunting dogs by a few enthusiasts in Ireland so the breed never completely disappeared. The Red and White has made a significant comeback since the 1980s and has recently been introduced to Canada.
CKC Breed Standard
Developed in Scotland, the Gordon Setter was stabilized by Alexander, the fourth Duke of Gordon, between 1770 and 1820. His purpose was to create a larger, heavier setter to adapt to the rugged Scottish countryside. It’s rumoured that some Collie and Bloodhound genes went into the Gordon’s makeup. It was a Gordon that won at the world’s first dog show, held in Britain in 1859. However, it should be noted that the competition was limited to Pointers and setters. In Britain, the Gordon Setter was among the first 46 breeds to be officially recognized and the breed was imported to this continent as early as 1840.
CKC Breed Standard
The Braque Français (French Pointer) is believed to have derived from dogs used to point game in the Mediterranean region as early as the 1300s. When these brown-and-white pointers spread throughout Europe, they evolved into regional types. In France, each type took on the name of its province.
CKC Breed Standard
Sometimes called “the grey ghost of Weimar,” this steel-grey sporting breed was developed in Germany at the court of the Grand Duke Karl August of Weimar as an all-purpose gun dog for the nobility. The breed was thought to have been perfected about 1810 and was carefully guarded by its developers, becoming a recognized breed in Germany in 1896. The following year, a club was formed to preserve and protect the breed from exploitation. Breeding was strictly controlled and only club members were allowed to own Weimaraners. The first specimens were brought to this continent by an American who was a member of the club and instrumental in forming a similar organization on this side of the Atlantic. Originally used to hunt big game, the Weimaraner is now used almost exclusively on small furred and feathered game.
CKC Breed Standard
When the right to hunt game was no longer restricted to nobility, the average German sportsman wanted an all-purpose dog, a companion that could hunt fur or feather on land or over water. The development of the German Short-haired Pointer began between 1870 and 1880. The breed was based primarily on dogs of Spanish Pointer origin crossed with various breeds to get the desired working ability. The blood of the English Pointer was introduced to add dash and superior scenting ability. Known as the ‘Kurzhaar’ in his country of origin, the GSP was first introduced to North America in the mid-1920s. It didn’t take long for the handsome breed to become established here as a popular sporting dog and family pet.
CKC Breed Standard
There’s no doubt the German Short-haired Pointer was (and is) a versatile sporting dog but German sportsmen wanted to go one better. Their aim was to produce a dog with all the versatility of the GSP but aggressive enough to be used in hunting dangerous game in rugged locales. What breeds were added to the GSP remains a matter of speculation. Some believe the Airedale was added to the gene pool while others claim it was the ancient Poodle or the Griffon. Whatever the ancestry, the German Wire-haired Pointer emerged as a classic pointer with more nerve but less speed than the GSP and with a tough coat to protect him under the worst of conditions.
CKC Breed Standard
A Dutchman by the name of Korthals, who resided in Germany, set out to create a sporting dog that could rival the performance of English gun dogs. However, he wanted one that would be better adapted to working in extreme cold, on marshy ground and in thick undergrowth. He began with Griffon stock and crossed the progeny with other sporting breeds, which may have included setters, spaniels, the French Pointer, the French Barbet and the German Short-haired Pointer. By 1870, his rough-coated, keen-nosed creation had been perfected and was initially christened the Korthals Griffon.
CKC Breed Standard
The rarest of the German Pointers, the German Long-haired is closely related to three other long-coated German sporting breeds: the Large Münsterländer, the Small Münsterländer and the Wachtelhund, the last being similar to the English Spaniel. Only the German Long- haired Pointer is recognized by The Canadian Kennel Club. In outline, the breed resembles a rather heavily constructed setter. Some believe the breed first appeared on the scene around 1860 but other authorities contend the breed traces back to medieval times. In Germany, the breed is still highly regarded as a versatile gun dog and family companion; however, the breed remains a rarity on this continent.
CKC Breed Standard
A long-legged spaniel with setter characteristics, the Blue Picardy is a versatile sporting dog with a reputation for locating and retrieving game under the most adverse conditions. The first French spaniels had their beginnings in the Middle East when French knights travelled to the Holy Land accompanied by their pointers and hounds, which interbred with Arabian Greyhounds. Over time, the spaniels of France separated into regional types. Picardie, France, was a paradise for hunters of waterfowl and, at the end of the 19th century, British hunters and dogs came to hunt in the area’s marshes and moors. When the British quarantine was put into effect, many English hunters boarded their setters on Picardie farms. Consequently, Picard spaniels were crossed with blue belton English and Gordon Setters and the Blue Picardy Spaniel was the result.
CKC Breed Standard
The Brittany is thought to represent a cross between the English Setter and the small French land spaniels. This is the Breton peasant’s hunting dog, known since the mid-19th century in the French province of Brittany and regarded as the smallest of the versatile gun dogs. The breed is able to point and retrieve game and works well in open country or dense cover. First exhibited in the Paris dog show in 1900, the Brittany’s reputation in the field soon spread among sportsmen around the world. The breed was first imported to this continent in the 1920s and by 1934 there was enough interest to warrant recognition by both the American and Canadian Kennel Clubs.
CKC Breed Standard
One of the oldest pointing dogs, the stately French Spaniel first gained fame in the Middle Ages. His style of freezing into the traditional point at the scent of a bird leads many to believe he may be the forerunner of today’s setter breeds. He was sufficiently well known in the 17th century to be depicted in engravings as he went about the task of seeking out pheasants and partridges around Versailles. A dog of strength and stamina, the French Spaniel shares the distinction with the Irish Water Spaniel of being the largest of the spaniel breeds. This ancient breed was first brought to Canada in 1974 and was given official CKC recognition in 1985.
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    CKC Breed Standard
    A large rugged dog of distinctive appearance, the coarse-haired Spinone was developed as an all-around gun dog whose specialty is working in marshy and wooded areas. A versatile hunting dog of ancient lineage, his origins are in northern Italy. Believed by some to be a mixture of several sporting breeds, such as the French Pointer, the French Griffon, the Barbet, the Porcelaine and the German Wire-haired Pointer, in appearance the Spinone is more hound-like. Once in danger of fading from the scene, the Spinone enjoyed renewed interest when the Italian Kennel Club came to his rescue. The breed has recently been recognized by the American Kennel Club.
    CKC Breed Standard
    The Vizsla, or Hungarian Pointer, may be of ancient lineage or it may be a product of the last century, depending on which dog historian one chooses to believe. Those who favour the theory of the breed’s antiquity cite stone etchings from the 10th century and a 14th-century manuscript on falconry illustrated with a picture of a dog resembling the Vizsla. Whatever its history, the Vizsla was perfectly suited to perform the duties of a pointer and retriever in the open plains of Hungary. Two world wars dealt harshly with the breed and only action by concerned breeders in Hungary and those countries to which the breed had been exported kept it from extinction. The breed has rebounded and is now considered the national dog of Hungary.
    CKC Breed Standard
    One of the rarest of the recognized breeds, the Wire-haired Vizsla is fairly new on the scene. Golden-rust wire-haired pointers had their beginnings when a smooth-coated Vizsla was mated to a German Wire-haired Pointer back in the early 1900s. Pups were bred back to Vizslas to keep the distinctive colour, but only those with wire coats were used for breeding. Once the breed was stabilized, the Wire-haired Vizsla was accepted in Hungary in 1950 and granted CKC recognition in 1978. Though some have been utilized in Canada for hunting, they are rarely seen in the show ring.
    CKC Breed Standard

    The CPDC promotes can u buy doxycycline over counter ALL of the pointing dog breeds as recognized by the CKC

    CKC Website: Sporting Dog List